Ram Head Trail

Ram Head is one of the best hikes on St. John. The popular trail takes hikers from a serene white sand beach in Saltpond Bay, past an idyllic cobblestone beach, and through blooming cactus fields before finally summiting spectacular 200 foot cliffs overlooking the Caribbean Sea. It's a short, hot hike with great views, and it's definitely a must do activity in Coral Bay.

 

Yawzi Point Trail

The Yawzi Point Trail is the easiest of the of three headland point trails on St. John's southeast coast (the other two being the Tektite Trail and Ram Head Trail). Running the ridge-line of the small headland between Great Lameshur Bay and Little Lameshur Bay, the Yawzi Point Trail is less than a mile round trip. In addition to hiking there are also snorkeling options off this popular Coral Bay trail. 

Tektite Trail

Tektite Project was a scientific research project by NASA in which teams of aquanauts lived in a fully submerged habitat off the southern coast of St. John. The Tektite Trail follows the ridge-line of the hill overlooking the former Tektite Project site in Great Lameshur Bay. Like the Ram Head Trail there are spectacular southern views off this headland, and it's one of best hikes in Coral Bay.

 

Lameshur Bay Trail

The beauty of the Lameshur Bay Trail is all the local Coral Bay attractions that it connects to along St. John's southern coast. From its start at Little Lameshur Bay the trail passes four historical ruins, connects to six other St. John hiking trails, and gives visitors access to three Coral Bay beaches including the beautiful white sand beach at Little Lameshur Bay. 

 
 

 

Reef Bay & Petroglyph Trail

The Reef Bay Trail and the Petroglyph Trail are located close to the center of St. John. The Reef Bay Trail runs from Centerline Road to Reef Bay passing under some of the largest trees on St. John, next to numerous sugar mill and plantation ruins, and past the only stone carvings on St. John that date back to pre-Columbian times. The Petroglyph Trail is a side trail off the Reef Bay Trail that gives hikers access to the stone carvings that sit around a fresh water pool in Reef Bay Valley. It's one of the most unique attractions on St. John. 

Though Reef Bay and the Petroglyph Trail are most commonly accessed off Centerline Road, there is also a way to reach the Reef Bay and Petroglyph Trail from the Coral Bay side of St. John by connecting via the Lameshur Bay Trail, which starts at Little Lameshur Bay.

 
White-tailed deer sharing the path on the Reef Bay Hiking Trail.

White-tailed deer sharing the path on the Reef Bay Hiking Trail.

Petroglyphs in the Reef Bay Valley accessible via the Petroglyph Trail.

Petroglyphs in the Reef Bay Valley accessible via the Petroglyph Trail.

Part of the sugar mill ruins at the end of the Reef Bay Trail.

Part of the sugar mill ruins at the end of the Reef Bay Trail.


 

Johnny Horn Trail

One of the steepest, hardest hikes in Coral Bay, the Johnny Horn Trail was named for a former St. John politician known for his cruelty and malice. Despite the trail's challenges it's a great connecting trail for Coral Bay visitors because from the trailhead in downtown Coral Bay hikers can access several attractions on St. John's north shore like Waterlemon Bay and the Murphy House ruins as well as East End hiking trails including the Brown Bay Trail.

Brown Bay Trail

On St. John's northern coast lies Brown Bay, a bay that is only accessibly by foot or boat as there is no modern road that reaches it. So by hiking the Brown Bay Trail visitors get access to a secluded St. John beach that not everyone gets to see. There are amazing sugar plantation ruins on the beach at Brown Bay and snorkeling in the semi-protected bay. The Brown Bay Trail also connects with several hiking trails on St. John's northern coast. 

 
View from the Murphy House ruins on the Johnny Horn Trail in Coral Bay, St. John 

View from the Murphy House ruins on the Johnny Horn Trail in Coral Bay, St. John